Bi Luo Chun by Teasenz

BI-LUO-CHUN-BY-TEASENZ

Chinese New Year atmospheric is still around and it’s always hard going back to the routines after a series of day-off. I am glad that my family and I could experience something new this year. On the first CNY’s eve dinner (we had like four feasts of lunch and dinner in total, meh), we had tea time in Gongfu style. My tea geek uncle has prepared all the equipments and I came with bags full of tea to Jakarta. It was so fun because I have never done this for massive audience like that. Well, the word massive refers to as many as ten people though. Hahah. But hey, that was quite hectic to serve everyone in such a big table like that.

Bi Luo Chun from Teasenz was the second tea after starting the ceremonial tea time with Himalayan Shangrila. My not-so-tea-drinker cousins really like this China’s top 10 most famous tea. We talked a lot, we laughed loudly and really cherished that moment of togetherness cheerfully. My granny even thought that I was doing a sales demo and asking if it would incur losses for me since no one pay me. Hahah. She’s so hilarious and we love her so much!

Name : Bi Luo Chun or literally meaning “Blue Snail Spring” because of its spiral shape
Origin: Dong Ting Mountain in Tai Lake, Jiang Su Province in eastern China

After Steeping (using yi xing teapot)
Wet Aroma : greenish and herbaceous, mellow floral and sweet (overall very aromatic)
Liquor color : pale green with shade of yellow
Amount of tea : 5,5 grams
Amount of water : 8 oz
Water Temperature : 78˚ C
Steeping Time : 30″/45″ / 1′
Wet leaf : vibrant green

The first time in my tea review history, I sum up the peep’s opinion about a particular tea into one line or two. The herbaceous notes of first infusion was refreshing and delightful. It has silky body and lightly savory just like many other green teas. Second infusion was our favorite as the flavor and color became more intense. The tea was silkier, creamier and left us sweet after taste. Very pleasing!

Dry Leaf before Steeping
Dry Aroma : vegetal and light floral notes
Dry color : jade green with white line hues
Dry shape : lean, spiral and curly, some of them are long (up to 5 cm)

2 responses

  1. ” [...] we had tea time in Gongfu style.”

    Reading this sentence, I can’t help imagining that you’re serving tea like a Wushu practitioner, with flying kicks, swords, faster-than-shadow movements, etc.

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